Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder. The muscles of the mouth, face, and respiratory system may become weak, move slowly, or not move at all after a stroke or other brain injury. The type and severity of dysarthria depend on which area of the nervous system is affected.
Some causes of dysarthria include stroke, head injury, cerebral palsy, and muscular dystrophy. Both children and adults can have dysarthria.  
What are some signs or symptoms of dysarthria?
A person with dysarthria may experience any of the following symptoms, depending on the extent and location of damage to the nervous system:
  • "Slurred" speech
  • Speaking softly or loudly
  • Slow rate of speech
  • Rapid rate of speech with a "mumbling" quality
  • Limited tongue, lip, and jaw movement
  • Abnormal intonation (rhythm) when speaking
  • Changes in vocal quality ("nasal" speech or sounding "stuffy")
  • Hoarse or breathy voice
  • Drooling or poor control of saliva
  • Chewing and swallowing difficulty